Finding Out The Truth in Investigatory Interviews: Falsehoods, Deceptions, Omissions and Interference

Instructor: Teri Morning
Product ID: 702733
  • Duration: 90 Min

recorded version

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This webinar will cover how to handle the investigatory interviews to find out the truth. The session will discuss the difference between misinterpreted recollection vs. purposeful distortion and how to get to the bottom of the situation.

Course "Finding Out The Truth in Investigatory Interviews: Falsehoods, Deceptions, Omissions and Interference" has been pre-approved by HRCI as eligible for 1.50 credits towards a participant's recertification upon full completion.
“The use of this seal is not an endorsement by the HR Certification Institute of the quality of the program”.

Why Should You Attend:

Employers conduct investigations for a variety of reasons; employee complaints, background checks, allegations of misconduct, losses of various types. The shared primary purpose of these investigations is the same - to find out the true facts of a situation to determine a course of action to take - or to not take.

In these investigations, employers often depend heavily upon employee’s recollections. Most employees will do their best to be forthcoming, and recount truthful and factual information to the best of their abilities. So how do you know when you’ve got all the accurate facts? That all witnesses have been forthcoming? Or haven’t purposefully given misrepresentations of the facts? If you’re talking to someone to find out what they know, that you don’t - how would you know what information if any that a witness distorted, left out or used to purposefully misinform? How is an investigator to know the difference between someone’s inaccurate recollections vs. purposeful misrepresentation?

By attending this webinar you will be able to understand the aforementioned and handle the investigatory interviews.

Areas Covered in the Webinar:

  • How to tell the difference between misinterpreted recollections vs. purposeful distortion or even providing misinformation.
  • Telling the difference between a witness’s selective memories vs. human forgetfulness.
  • Finding out if the investigator didn’t ask an understandable, good question vs. a witness’s purposeful omission.
  • How to start an interview so most witnesses will be truthful and forthcoming from the beginning.
  • How to get to facts that were omitted whether purposefully or not.
  • Getting to the bottom of inference and untangling the web of deception.
  • The best defense is a good offense mindset – Interviewing those who disorder, complicate, blow up and back track.
  • Leave the TV shows out - The 5 best ways to tell if someone is lying to you.
  • How to ask good questions to get good answers.

Who Will Benefit:

This webinar will provide valuable assistance to all personnel in:

  • Employee Relations
  • HR Generalists and HR Associates
  • Those in non-HR jobs who have investigatory responsibilities

Instructor Profile:

Teri Morning, MBA, MS, SPHR, SPHR-CA is the President of her own HR Consulting firm She has over 15 years human resource and training experience in a variety of professional fields, including retail, distribution, architectural, engineering, consulting, manufacturing (union), public sector and both profit and non-profit company structures. She has consulted with employers on their problems and trained managers and employees for over 10 years, meeting and working with employees from all types of businesses. In addition to a MBA, Teri has a Master's degree in Human Resource Development with a specialization in Conflict Management. She was certified by the State of Indiana in mediation skills, is qualified as a Myers-Briggs practitioner and holds the dual SHRM certification of a Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR) and Senior Professional in Human Resources – California (SPHR-CA).

Topic Background:

In the beloved children’s book, Charlotte’s Web, deceptive action from the spider Charlotte resulted in a happy ending. In the real world workplace, deception, omission and interference often have the unhappy result of someone being reprimanded or retaliated against for conduct they didn’t do or in which they didn’t participate. For others who should have been held accountable but were not, the conduct often continues on, in some ways rewarding them and encouraging a repeat of the conduct.

Sir Walter Scott stated, “Oh what a tangled web we weave, when first we practice to deceive.” In an investigation, it can difficult to determine what are the truthful facts when information is purposefully withheld (omissions), false information is purposefully inferred (deception) or when false information is purposefully provided (falsehoods). Such tactics interfere with an investigation. Interestingly many people don’t even consider omission to be a lie. After all, they consider, if not asked of them, it can’t be wrong to withhold information. Yet some experts claim that “lying by omission” is the most common kind of lie.

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